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The Graces

Χαριτες

The Charites

The Graces

Since their name means Grace these three beautiful daughters of Zeus and Eurynome are often called The Graces. Their names are Aglaia (Splendor), Euphrosyne (Festivity), and Thalia (Rejoicing).

They wove the material for Aphrodite's robe. They also tended to Aphrodite when she returned to the island of Kypros (Cyprus), humiliated after she had been caught in the trap her husband, Hephaistos (Hephaestus), had set to catch her and Ares (god of War) in the embrace of love. The Graces bathed her, anointed her with ambrosial oil and dressed her in delightful clothing so that she might resume her loving duties.

Homer used the beauty of the Graces ironically to depict the horror of war when he described a dead Trojan soldier's hair as being 'lovely as the Graces' before it was splattered with blood and mingled with the dirt.

The Graces

Graces are often confused with the Roman goddesses, the Gratiae.

The Graces in The Iliad

(listed by book and line)

The line numbers listed here correspond fairly well with the Lattimore and Murray/Wyatt translations of The Iliad. Other translations (Fitzgerald, Fagles et al) do not correspond as well but, with a small amount of effort, you should be able to find the reference you need regardless of the translation you use.

The Graces in The Odyssey

(listed by book and line)

The line numbers listed here correspond fairly well with the Lattimore and Murray/Dimock translations of The Odyssey. Other translations (Fitzgerald, Fagles et al) do not correspond as well but, with a small amount of effort, you should be able to find the reference you need regardless of the translation you use.

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Other Text References

Theogony

The Astronomy

The Kypria

The Argonautika

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The Graces

The Graces dance at the Acropolis of Athens.

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